Friday, July 16, 2010

Questions and observations


Lately I am finding many of these worms all around the garden, especially under pots and rocks. They look like earthworms but are not the same. I’m wondering if they are good or bad for the garden. I’ll appreciate your comments.

I took a picture of this moth yesterday and I can’t find the name in any of my books. Any idea??
Is magic

This Plumeria flower fell from a tall tree and was held in mid air by one strand from a tiny spider’s web. Isn’t nature grand!!!

11 comments:

Susan said...

You're right...nature is grand. Beautiful! I get those same litle worms under my pots, too, but I don't know if they're good or bad. Sorry I can't help identify any of the worms or the moth. I look forward to what others have to say about the worms.

Nicole said...

Are they brown millipedes? Millipedes are beneficial as they help in helping break down plant material and return nutrients to the soil.

The Florida Blogger said...

I had a big green worm on my tomato plants today. I wondered if that was the beginning of a Monarch butterfly.

David said...

Yep, those are millipedes. They curl up for protection and move slowly. In contrast, centipedes have fewer legs and are much faster. Centipedes are hunters and very beneficial. You'll see them sometimes in the compost pile or under dead leaves.
Millipedes eat old leaves and are seldom a problem. Some are poisonous to touch so be careful.
I enjoy your garden blog a lot. It's on my favorites list. I'm just starting my garden blog over here in Houston.
David @ Tropical Texana

Suze said...

The moth is one I've seen in our yard too, here in Pembroke Pines. It is a Scape Moth - I believe a "yellow collared scape moth".

Suze said...

Actually - I've looked further and it is not a yellow collared scape moth. It is a white tipped black moth, a.k.a. http://collier.ifas.ufl.edu/CommHort/CommHortPubs/Snowbush%20Caterpillar.pdf

Darla said...

They have been everywhere this year and I see you have your answer. I believe that the centipedes shell is soft were the millipedes is hard, also I believe the centipedes are posionous and th millipedes are not.?

Floridagirl said...

Definitely millipedes. My sons used to capture them and play with them, of course, returning them to the garden later. Son #1, when he was just four or five, somehow carried one into Publix with him without me noticing. The stench became strong enough that I had to search out the cause. Sure enough, he had smuggled in a millipede.

Wendy said...

Yes, nature is grand! Your photos speak to that!

My Little Family: said...

I see that moth too here in Central Florida but not the millipede. When I move pots I usually see cock roaches, yuck!

SiestaSister said...

That looks like the moth that usually strips my snow-on-the-mountain bushes. I think this year because of the super cold weather that didn't happen like it did the previous 2 years.